Product Terms of Use

Product Terms of Use

Electric Bikes 

Individuals aged 14 and above can operate an electric bike that meets specific criteria without the need for a license, registration, taxation, or insurance. These bicycles are referred to as 'electrically assisted pedal cycles' (EAPCs) and must feature pedals for propulsion. An EAPC must display information such as the power output, motor manufacturer, battery voltage, and maximum speed.

The electric motor of an EAPC must not exceed 250 watts and should not provide assistance over 15.5mph. EAPCs can have more than two wheels, like a tricycle, and are considered normal pedal bikes for usage on cycle paths and areas where bicycles are allowed.

Summary

In the UK, electric bikes (EAPCs) must adhere to the following regulations:

  • Riders must be 14 years or older
  • No license, registration, tax, or insurance is required
  • Pedals must be present for propulsion
  • Display requirements for power output, motor manufacturer, battery voltage, and maximum speed
  • An e-bike must have a motor with a maximum continuous power output of 250W to be road legal
  • A maximum speed of 15mph (25 km/h) is permitted on public roads (Surpassing the authorized speed limit could lead to the classification of the e-bike as a motorcycle or moped, necessitating the acquisition of suitable licenses, insurance, and registration)
  • Although not compulsory, it is advisable to wear a helmet for personal safety
  • E-bikes are classified as bicycles and must follow the same rules and regulations as standard bicycles

E-Scooters

E-bikes are permissible in the UK, but e-scooters are subject to different regulations. The usage of privately owned e-scooters on public roads and pavements is prohibited in most parts of the UK, with the exception of specific trial areas. The UK government is currently conducting trials of rental e-scooters in designated regions to evaluate their effectiveness and influence on transportation systems. The varying regulations for e-scooters are largely driven by safety considerations and the necessity for suitable infrastructure to accommodate their use.

In December 2023, it was announced that the Department for Transport had informed councils that the legalisation of all e-scooters was still being considered, but they had yet to secure a timeframe for the proposed legalisation. Consequently, the e-scooter trials have been prolonged by an additional two years until May 31, 2026.

All regulations on our website will be regularly updated to align with UK laws. For additional guidance, please reach out to info@powertopedal.com